Time well spent

I believe my time spent at home due to my current situation should be well spent. Why not French? Today, I picked up my ” Living Language Conversational French” book. I found at Bookends/cafe’ last year while in downtown. It’s been interesting because the cassettes are missing to the book which are kinda vital to learning the French language. You know me, I decided to improvise a little. Searched and found a few websites that let you search the French word and has been a great guide to teaching me the pronunciations. These are a few French words I have learned.
Name: Albert origin-French. Pronunciation#1 AL-burt. Pronunciation#2 al-BAIR
Name: Charles origin-French. Pronunciation#1 CHAR’-ulls
Name: Francois origin-French. Pronunciation#1 frahn-swah Pronunciation#2 frah(n)-ZWAH

Bonjour!

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A midnight snack.

This was completely spontaneous which made for some fun cooking. I love to improv cook because it inspires you to be creative with the products available. Matthew and I tend to be night owls and I like to watch cooking shows on the create channel late at night if I watch anything. Well, I started feeling inspired and hungry at the same time. So, I opened the fridge to see what I could come up with for the both of us. I spotted chorizo, minced olives, purple onion, chopped spinach, flour tortillas, sour cream, cilantro, cheddar cheese and guacamole. I decided to make us a festive, mexican appetizer.

Step 1. Let chorizo cook thoroughly, add minced olives, chopped spinach, 1 Tsp of onion flakes, 1 tsp of cumin powder, 1 tsp of chili powder and wait to add cilantro until very last minute.

Meanwhile saute’ onion until carmelized. Then add to chorizo mixture.

Cook tortilla shells until perfectly brown.

Spread guacamole on tortilla shell, the chorizo mixture, a dallop of sour cream and a pinch of cheddar cheese. Voila! You have a delicious mexican appetizer.

Book Review: ” A Cook’s Tour.” By Anthony Bourdain

I have been reading ” A Cook’s Tour” By Anthony Bourdain. The book is vivid in painting the reader a picture of the sounds, smells,flavor, taste, styles and traditions of the countries he visited during his tour around the world. The reader almost feels as if they are on the same journey with the author. Experiencing every emotion from delighted, sad, scared, angry, curious and overall inspired. There is a raw humor in this book that is undoubtedly keen and delightful.
If by some random chance I was to meet Anthony Bourdain..I might just pee my pants. I like the unpolished aspect of it all. Next time your looking for an adventure, try this.

Happy Cinco De Mayo!

My beautiful sisters and I grabbed a bite to eat at On the Border. The food wasn’t all that great but the company was excellent. Between all three of us there was plenty of fun to share around the table. I would say the best thing as far as food goes was the salsa. Everything else tasted like it had been pulled out of the freezer and cooked until a sufficient timing..then served. I think I have become a food snob since culinary school. Heck, atleast we got a discounted price right? ( Cinco De Mayo) We then marched our booties off to see ” The Pirates! Band of Misfits.” Arrrr! Hilarious and very cute movie.

Happy Cinco De Mayo! I will drink to that.

My beautiful best friends

Taking jello shots.

Chelsea and I being goofballs.

Hope you had a wonderful Cinco De Mayo!

Finished this semester off. That is until fall comes around..

I took my final test for this semester in Food Production I. I feel a sweet sense of relief and accomplishment. I feel more knowledgeable than going in which count’s right? Here is the research paper I wrote for this class.

THE BIRTHPLACE OF MODERN FOOD 1

The Birthplace of Modern Food
Porter, Natalie K.
Pulaski Technical College THE BIRTHPLACE OF MODERN FOOD 2

As I began researching the place where food truly evolved it began with history, traditions,heritage,diversity,culture and travel. History and it’s many evolving chef’s brought forth new and daring decisions that would later revolutionize the way we create food. The idea of taking a simple recipe and questioning the possibilities.Recipes become edited or decorated with changing.
Tradition is that of something more grounded. Tradition celebrates the enrichment of being apart of something you always will be. Food is something we long for and it unifies us in tradition. The upbringing of where one came from correlates with the food in which one partook in thus heritage plays a big part as well.
All over the world, meals are being prepared yet every meal is diverse. There are numerous recipes and seasonings that have been discovered. Yet, where would they originate if there wasn’t diversity? Many have explored, settled and traded for the cultural flavor captured from regions across the world. Slaves from Africa took their culinary tradition with them to distant lands. Later introducing native foods to their homeland such as okra, black eyed peas, sweet potatoes, watermelon, and sesame seeds (Samuelsson, 3).
Poverty, though common in many regions hasn’t stiffened the flow of food production. Conversely, it’s given a creative outlook of working with what’s available at the given time. Cultivation is the primary source of labor in these poverty stricken areas as many share the same water source( Bourdain, 40). Shared labor is essential during harvest time in preparing for the fundamental needs of those around you.
Culinary Arts has deeply rooted itself within urban cities and farmlands. The city has soaked up business as restaurants open daily. Rural Farm life tends to focus on the development of livestock, fruits, vegetables and show casing their products at local markets. Yet, there is a significant connection between the two. Restaurants are promoting healthier choices and organic farming by purchasing products from local farmers. Farmer’s in turn are making profit to continue thriving, “organically.” Preserving the harvest is also very important in making sure seasonal vegetables last all year long. Many vegetables lose their vitamins as soon as they are harvested unless preserved. This has become a popular choice for many across the world.
Chefs are traveling to grasp the ethnic taste the foreign regions expound ( Samuelsson, 2).
These destinations are vast in color and textural combinations are anything but dull or un sufficed. ( Samuelsson, 1).The meaning of a culture isn’t easily understood. ( Samuelsson, 39). This is where chef’s and foodies alike are forever expanding their palates. We cannot discover without first using our five senses. The visual display of food being prepared, smells painting kitchens with sweet aroma, sounds of gathering around a table in unity, soaking up the tastes the food willingly yields and texture and touch of the meals structure when consuming. A journey that lends itself to new and old. Feeding creativity through researching various outlets such as cookbooks, fresh markets, travel, and experienced resources.Taking chances as well as keeping an open-mind.
Knowledge is gained by observation which will lend itself to those who receive. The architecture, design and customs of specific cultures deepen the meaning of refined cuisine ( Bourdain, 52). THE BIRTHPLACE OF MODERN FOOD 3

Many cultures share a different style of food production than others. While some may cook over an open flame others may use more unconvential methods. This separates not only the style but taste of many cuisines around the world. The kitchens located in the U. S. restaurants carry the necessary cooking utensils and supplies. Whereas, villages located oustide the U.S. find ways of managing and using the resources availabe at a given time. Ironically, though U.S. is rich in supplies more food is wasted than in poverty stricken villages. The people in these villages have learned to be creative in not only preparing meals but using their resources wisely. Many overlooked parts of an animal such as: feet, jaw, nose, ears, head, tail ect. There is no such thing as “good” and “bad” ingredients ( Bourdain, 18 ). The easiest way to learn about a country’s cuisine is through exploring the condiments, relishes, toppings, and spreads that dress up local food ( Samuelsson, 24). Many of these recipes contain a mixture of history and unity. Settlers visiting from other mainlands brought homeland flavors to other regions, intertwining techniques uniquely with the region where they settled.
Many african villages form a paste with cornmeal. ( Samuelsson, 49). It is then formed into an edible spoon used for dipping into stews or sauces. Food is so much more than just taste alone,it’s knowing the meals you grew up on that bring you comfort. Often, atmosphere and chemistry play a big part in showcasing the personality, style, and energy of not only the meal being prepared but the place where it all began.
Many restaurants here in the U.S. serve the appetizer first to the customer. This being the tease before the actual entree is served. An appetizer generally sets the mood for what’s to come. Villages across the world are revolutionizing the way we look at this conception. Generally, what would be served as the starter is prepared as the main course in other countries.
It’s more about sustenance and managing the simple dollar than order of food. This includes vegetables, salads, olives, bread ect..( Samuelsson, 49). In some cases, the same meal is prepared for breakfast, lunch and dinner.
Meat is considered an expensive luxury and in certain cultures religion calls for abstaining any for several days. Hearty vegetables are used in place of the meat. Nothing goes to waste and every part of the plant is used. The person preparing the meal uses these vegetables in soups, stews, and sauces. ( Samuellson, 80). Market shopping is done weekly for the entire household which sometimes consist of twenty people or so. Every market has it’s own flair but one thing they have in common is the bargains many find there. ( Samuellson, 91).Whether it be sundried caterpillars, es’cargo, head cheese, blood sausage, roasted tarantula eggs, these are considered a fine delicacy in some regions.
Meats in higher prices are considered dishes of celebration. Just as other parts of the world, meat is the centerpiece of a meal. ( Samuellson, 116). The closing of the meal ends with dessert which is kept light and simple. Typically when you think of dessert it tends to be heavier and rich usually doused with a sauce of some sort. Fruit is served in other regions with a sprinkle of sugar or honey. The dessert is planned around the main course. The heavier the main course the lighter the dessert. If the main course is ligher than a heavier dessert will follow afterwards (Samuelsso,150).
There is something special about gathering people, food and interests. Where there is good conversation, there shall be food. Food yields a richness, depth and truth.
The memories of where we came from and where we’re going. Because, food is more than a substance it’s a story. Work cited

Samellson, Marcus. Discovery of a Continent: Foods, Flavors and Inspirations from Africa. John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Hobeken, New Jersey. 2007.

Bourdain, Anthony. No Reservations: Around the World on an Empty Stomach.
Bloomsbury. New York, New York. 2007.